500 words approx. 2.5 minutes to read.

Plastic waste is a huge environmental issue. At Co-op, we’re reducing our use of plastic, and where we do use it, we are making it easy to recycle or reuse by 2023. I’d like to explain here how we’re tackling the issue. I’ll also provide some simple ways in which you can help.

One difficulty is that some plastics can be recycled and some can’t. Black plastic can’t be recycled, for instance, because the machinery at recycling centres doesn’t recognise it as recyclable; this is because the sensors can’t ‘see’ the black, meaning the plastic is rejected and incinerated or sent to landfill, where it can remain for hundreds of years without decomposing. So we’re replacing this kind of plastic with clear, uncoloured, recyclable material. We have made huge progress on this work with some market-leading changes in place.

Also, councils don’t all accept the same types of plastic. This means you need to check the symbols on packaging to see what sort of plastic it is and whether your council will accept it. Ideally, we’d like all products to be labelled in the same, clear way, and for the council advice to be the same in every part of the country.

What we’ve already achieved

  • We’ve prevented 465 tonnes of waste plastic by dropping black trays from our fruit and veg. That’s roughly equivalent in weight to 42 double-decker buses!
  • Our water bottles are made from 50% recycled materials, preventing 349 tonnes of refuse
  • We were the first supermarket to use certified compostable carrier bags – which can be used for food waste collection at home – saving 366 tonnes of plastic waste
  • We’ve saved 200 tonnes of non-recyclable polystyrene by switching it for cardboard in our pizza discs
  • The tray for our minced beef is now made from a single material, so the packaging is much easier to recycle, saving 163 tonnes of plastic from landfill
  • Our healthier-snack packs now come in a recyclable film pouch, replacing 5.2 tonnes of the old packaging
  • We have removed the plastic trays from tenderstem broccoli and asparagus tips, removing 43 tonnes of plastic waste.
  • Replaced plastic packaging on our golden kiwis, ready-to-eat kiwis and pears, apples and organic avocado with pulp packaging, thanks to Co-op Members joining in to tell us their ideas for plastic reduction.

What we’re planning

  • Removing plastic that’s not designed to be reused or recycled by 2023
  • Collaborating with the rest of the food industry and universities to find better ways to reduce plastic waste
  • Making our labelling clearer, so you can tell what’s recyclable
  • Ensuring the packaging we use extends shelf life and helps to reduce food waste

8 ways you can cut down on plastic

  1. Wrap sandwiches in greaseproof paper, not cling film or, better still, use a reusable box
  2. Reuse plastic pots or glass jars for storing food
  3. Use paper straws for your drinks instead of plastic ones
  4. Reuse your green Co-op compostable carrier bag for food waste – make sure your local council will collect it. You can always use it in a your home compost bin if you have one.
  5. Take reusable bags when you go shopping. We have a range for every type of shopping trip – look out for the fold-away bags that slip neatly into a pocket or handbag.
  6. Buy a reusable coffee cup for takeaway drinks
  7. Choose products that come in recyclable containers
  8. Check labels or go to recyclenow.com to see if packaging is recyclable in your area

Find our more on what we’re doing to tackle plastic on our website, or head to recyclenow.com or wrap.org.uk for guidance on how your can help.

Together, let’s help make plastic waste a thing of the past!

Iain Ferguson,
Environment Manager

Read more on how we’re working on sustainability:

Join the conversation! 7 Comments

  1. Brilliant news from the co-operative society! – it’s great to see that there is at least one supermarket that is paying some attention to the effects of climate change and global warming and the contributory effects of household waste to damaging the environment.
    This restores my hope in the future of our beautiful planet and the difference we can all make to the quality of life for our children and grandchildren.
    Well done, co-op! Keep up the good work!

    Like

    Reply
  2. Please look at your policy for coop forecourt garage shops, you need to put a simple water tap outside to fill up water bottles or to wash windscreens on the car.
    You sell us screen wash instead in plastic bottles . All the excess to be recycled or disposed of. Just think how much less plastic waste there will be if you change to having a water tap on the forecourt and it’s free! People do not want to use chemicals (screen-wash) in plastic containers. Whose idea was it?

    Like

    Reply
  3. Well Done CO-OP Food once again first to lead on this, I hope all the others will catch up soon.
    Loose veg is the way to go.

    Like

    Reply
  4. Most of your suggestions to reduce plastic waste are already in use in quite a lot of households. I look to Co-op for far more than that but but you are sadly lacking in reducing your own plastic use: plastic wrapped cucumbers; loose produce more expensive than that wrapped or packaged in plastic. Come on Co-op, start practising what you’re preaching. How can we reduce our plastic if everything we buy from you is covered in the stuff!

    Like

    Reply
  5. I take exception from being told how to recycle! I won’t even have plastic windows in my home. Any plastics come from my purchases. Sort your own house out, I will see to mine I’m now unsubscribing

    Like

    Reply
  6. Excellent news COOP. WE MUST ALL PUT ADDITIONAL EFFORT INTO LOOKING AFTER OUR ENVIRONMENT. TIME IS NOT ON OUR SIDE!

    Like

    Reply
  7. I can only congratulate the Co-op on really trying to reduce its plastic use, which also reduces ours!
    As you’re trying so hard to be environmentally friendly can I ask why you have so little organic,or at least,free range poultryand meat. I use a store in St Marychurch, Torquay, fairly regularly and every time I search in vain for free range chicken and pork.Outdoor bred is NOT the same as free range!

    Like

    Reply

Join the conversation

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Category

Food