Approx 1120 words.

This year has opened our eyes to the gross inequalities that still exist all around us. The killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis and the global protests it sparked, rightly told us that tackling race discrimination must be an everyday priority for all of us.  

We know that when it comes to race, the issues we’re facing are systemic, deeply entrenched, and knotty. It may seem complicated, but at the end of the day this is about everyone having a fair and equal chance to fulfil their potential. 

At the Co-op, we believe that the act of not being racist, is not enough. I’m crystal clear that we must be Anti-Racist.  

Being Anti-Racist, means that we’ll work to eliminate individual, institutional and systemic racial inequalities that currently exist within our Co-op. And we’ll do all we can to influence the wider world too. We won’t stand by when we see racism happening. We’ll speak out and we’ll act against it.  

I know we’re far from where we want to be right now, but honest recognition of this is an important first step.  

Our founders – the Rochdale Pioneers – were world changers. And since then the Co-op has continued to be bold in taking a stand. Co-operators in Britain worked to end slavery during the American Civil War in the 1860s, and our own Co-op supported the South African apartheid boycott in the 1980s. But the responsibility is now on us, to wake up each day and make new, proactive and tangible choices for the better.  

At the Co-op we’ve set ourselves the vision of ‘co-operating for a fairer world’. To be frank, we will not achieve our vision without delivering on these commitments. These aren’t on the side, or nice to have. Our very purpose of existence will fly or fail based on our ability to deliver these commitments.  

I’ve no doubt that future generations will judge us on how well we respond to this challenge. We’ve got a long way to go. But I have the talent, energy and determination of my colleagues alongside me and I’m sure the support of our millions of Co-op members. 

Steve Murrells
Co-op CEO  

Our new commitments 

Campaigning 

Throughout our 175-year history, we’ve campaigned for social change on the issues that matter to 

our members – from women’s suffrage and food standards to modern slavery and loneliness. Right now, it’s time to use our voice on issues of racial equality. 

So, we’ll 

  • Work with our Co-op Academies Trust to develop a new curriculum on anti-racism so that the next generation knows what it means to be anti-racist. We’ll then lobby the government to roll this out as part of the national school curriculum across the UK. 
  • We’ll publish annually our ethnicity pay gap. As we know transparency drives action, so we will call on the government to make this mandatory for all businesses. 

Colleagues 

Our business is owned by our millions of Co-op members across the UK, so we want our leaders and managers to reflect the diversity of the nation and the local communities we serve.  

So, we’ll  

  • Double the representation of Black, Asian, and minority ethnic leaders and managers across the business by the end of 2022, moving from 3% to 6%, and then to 10% by 2025. To make sure we achieve this, we’ll have diverse shortlists for all leadership roles – no exceptions, and we’ll partner with organisations that will help us to reach talent from Black, Asian or minority ethnic backgrounds. 
  • Maximise the use of our apprenticeship levy and seek partnerships and opportunities which focus on benefitting Black, Asian and ethnic minority candidates. 
  • Collect and monitor data which enables us to track progress and reduce inequalities within our internal systems and processes when it comes to promotion and opportunities. 
  • Require all our leaders to have objectives that ensure they are playing their part in delivering to our commitments to racial equality from 2021. 

Community 

Supporting and strengthening local communities is at the heart of who we are and we’ve been improving our diversity and inclusion in recent years. Now we’re going much further.  

So, we’ll 

  • Use our Community Wellbeing Index, ethnicity data, external evidence and partner insight to understand issues of race inequality in the communities we support and where we need to focus our activity. 
  • Increase the number of local causes whose projects include Black, Asian, and ethnic minority beneficiaries to 25% through the Local Community Fund. 
  • Increase the number of ethnic minority led community organisations that our charity the Co-op Foundation will support. 
  • Provide targeted vocational and enrichment opportunities for Black, Asian and ethnic minority students at our Co-op Academy schools, building on their individual aspirations and ambitions. 
  • Work with the Co-op Academies Trust to increase the representation of senior leaders in the Trust. 
  • Target racial inequality as part of a broader focus on youth inequality through national programmes and the partnerships we select. 

Products and services 

Our products, services and customer proposition must reflect the diversity of our communities. 

That means making sure that what we sell meets the needs of our ethnic minority communities and our Co-op brand is seen as inclusive and welcoming. 

So, we’ll 

  • Create more diverse consumer and member panels to get closer to what our customers and members need from our businesses. 
  • Develop specific products for ethnic minority groups and equip our colleagues with training in order to service our newly-attracted customers well e.g. our soon-to-be launched African and Caribbean funeral service. 
  • Ensure stronger representation of Black, Asian and ethnic minority groups across all our marketing platforms. 
  • Ensure that we celebrate with communities and that our products meet the needs of our customers as they celebrate key cultural events. 
  • Create more inclusive ways to access product and service information. 
  • Change our procurement process so that we partner and invest more with suppliers that have a strong focus on inclusion and closing the inequality gap in their own businesses. 
  • Encourage ethnic diversity as a focus for the businesses we trade with and offer practical support and encouragement where we can to those that need to progress. 

Members 

As a co-operative, we exist to meet the needs of our members and respond to their concerns. So it’s vital that we listen to them on this issue so we can become a truly inclusive and welcoming organisation.  

So, we’ll 

  • Ask our members from Black and Asian and ethnic minority communities to tell us how they view us and what we need to change to make us more welcoming and inclusive. 
  • Once we really understand these views, we’ll work to address the issues being raised. 

Join the conversation! 89 Comments

  1. This evening May 19 I went to my local co op and was refused to be served.I am a women of colour.when it was my turn the man closed his till and said I am not serving her snd walked away.two female staff said aww why you doing that he said I am not serving her.I was belittled by him .

    Reply
  2. This is all complete cant, albeit very typical in these toxic, neo-Marxised times. The only racism in the home of the English people is against the English people, and constitutes a relentless coercion of foreign peoples upon them while instricting them that they have no moral right to dissent, indeed that dissent is a unique Original Sin of white colour.

    Colonised native peoples, regardless of skin colour, can never be “racist” for rejecting their colonisers and cleaving to life and survival in their own blessed home. The life of the natives must be the highest value on the land. Making the coloniser “equal” to the native withdraws from the native to power to survive.

    Reply
  3. ‘service our newly-attracted customers well’. What on earth are you talking about? You want to become a BAME only supplier? 87% of the country is white. As for having higher proportion BAME only anything .., utter divisive nonsense. Not with my money thanks. When can we ‘owners’ vote in this?

    Reply
  4. We have never had the embedded racism that America has had. We have not had to bring in massive law changes like the Civil rights bill. To pretend we are anything like a America is disingenuous to our history. The U.K. has consistently ranked highly as a country where ethnics can live and prosper. Why we have to change UK society to align to a defunding organisation like BLM is beyond me, or actually embarrassing. We are being driven by North American social media. All these proposals are in effect ‘positive racism’, which many would consider racist. All jobs should be filled on merit. As for the funerals plan …

    Reply
    • Yes, we have had…and still have.

      Multiple studies show this…in areas such policing, job applications and much much more.

      Still, if you are racist yourself, shop elsewhere.

      Reply
  5. Although the organisation’s commitments are well meaning and commendable, they are naive and I fear for the unintended consequences. The Co-op should be aiming for inclusivity and a true meritocracy, rather than setting arbitrary targets which will cause division and alienation. Take the commitment to “Increase the number of local causes whose projects include Black, Asian, and ethnic minority beneficiaries to 25% through the Local Community Fund” – how did the Co-op arrive at a figure of 25% when the BAME population of the UK is 13%? Will this discriminate against local causes that apply for funding in areas where the BAME population is low, through no fault of their own? The Co-op should look at the make-up of the local area when a cause requests funding, rather than taking a blanket approach.

    Another example is the commitment to “Maximise the use of our apprenticeship levy and seek partnerships and opportunities which focus on benefitting Black, Asian and ethnic minority candidates”. Will white British and European candidates therefore be discriminated against and potentially excluded from apprenticeships, through no fault of their own apart from being born with a pale coloured skin? The co-op should be looking to eliminate all forms of discrimination, ‘positive’, negative or otherwise, as all have negative consequences. Inclusivity and recruitment based on merit only would represent true progress.

    Reply
  6. I think those who oppose affirmative action in staff selection misunderstand what is proposed. I’m sure that those responsible for appointing staff to leadership positions will always choose the candidate who is best qualified. What is proposed, as I understand it, is ensuring that the proportion of BAME applicants on the short list is proportionate to their representation in the population as a whole, so that in time they will be represented in the same way in staffing levels. Perhaps a future newsletter should make this clear. I applaud the whole Co-op approach to racism. Well done!

    Reply
    • Norman,
      There is a contradiction between “candidate who is best qualified” and “proportionate to their representation in the population as a whole”. You can’t have both.
      What you can do is ensure that there are no obstacle to recruitment and promotion based on characteristics that have nothing to do with the job.

      Reply
      • I don’t think you understand how pervasive racism really is. Much of it is unconscious, which is to say that many people lack the self awareness to recognise when decisions are influenced by embedded and cultural racism.

        Reply
  7. Completely agree but we must not support the Black Lives Matter group as it is a front for a Marxist organisation that has objectives, like defunding the police, that have nothing to do with racism and are left-wing ideologues that the British people have consistently rejected. They try to close down arguments by accusing people of racism if they say anything against BLM but this is the way extremists operate. Reject racism but also reject BLM and their pernicious ideology.

    Reply
    • BLM is not an organisation Joe. It has no policy on defunding the police or anything else for that matter except opposing racism in the face of institutional and especially police brutality. Some protesters have taken on particular campaigns but you’re wrong to assume this is the policy of BLM, which exists because….well I assume everyone who watched that awful video of George Floyd’s murder knows why they exist

      Reply
      • We need not to keep focusing on the BLM. What happened to George Floyd was a terrible thing But we need Thus toots on the streets to stop. The police are not all the same. We have to realize that we are all the same. Does not matter what colour or race. Lately things have got out of hand. I do mot agree with all that is said about racism. It Can go both ways. There is good and bad in every country Our Co/op staff as far as I have seen are all Asians. They are nice people We need to be able all to work together with white and Black. You say about the Afician funerals ect so that will be with Black undertakers.Thats a good idea. But that is changing things. Sounds as though you are dividing people. People do need to mix. I have black friends I do not look on them becouse of there colour. It’s what they are inside. It’s all to do with Attitude on both sides. So let’s hope it all goes will As I have said its pregudist on both sides. I hope that in the near future Things will change

        Reply
    • Interesting thoughts on BLM but if you don’t se that their policy re-the Police in the UK is almost redundant as the Tory party have been very successful in pursuing that for the last ten years. As to being Marxist perhaps you could give references as to in what manner and who are the guilty parties?
      You might also consider where the Pioneers would stand in the C19th proposing communal good and aiming to help the ordinary citizen rather than seeing profit flowing endlessly into the pockets of the already too wealthy.
      When any group form with given aims it is in reaction to the contemporary world in which they live and the txt above mentions George Floyd and implicitly the four hundred years of persecution and suppression of those whose lives ber the scars of the African Diaspora.

      BLM in the UK is a word apart from that in the USA but to think that we do not have racism here is to live in a white wonderland. I would love to know whether the Co-op Part suffers from the same Nelsonian eye that permeates our society in relation to the omnipresent threat of being labelled an anti-semite when justifiably, in agreement with the vast majority of countries within the UN, you point out the seventy plus years of overt racism as expressed by the neo-colonialist, ever expanding State of Israel: an Apartheid State as self defined by its passing of the Nation State Law.

      For Co-op members and the officials at all levels not to recognise this is appalling.
      You cannot support a two state solution when one of the Parties is intent on destroying the other and to call resistance to never ending military incursion and control is to agree with bigotry and hypocrisy of the highest order.

      Comments?

      Reply
  8. I could not agree more

    Reply
  9. Angry and sad to see so much racist comment on this subject. I’ve lived and London and the provinces and I’ve always found the Coop staff whether black, white or other to be efficient, well trained and good with customers. The selection and training process is obviously effective so I am confident that it will remain so. If it has not been representative of BAME and certain other minorities then that can and should be changed. The food on the shelves should be appropriate to the needs of the communities it serves., especially if there are no other shops that do.

    Reply
  10. Although I’m not surprised, I am very disappointed that many people still have a (yes/but/no/but) attitude… Even people who claim to have one faith or another.

    We were born ‘Colour-blind’ and any prejudice about anything or anyone has been either nature or nurture.. It is difficult to stomach ‘positive discrimination’ when you loose out to it (as I did in the 1980’s) however, I absolutely understand the need for it..
    I would prefer that it also included the disadvantaged from ‘every’ background or race/gender…

    In other words, just let everyone have an equal chance…if that means extra help for some, give it joyfully..

    Reply
  11. Well done Co-op for standing up to racism. Unfortunately things have got worse over the years as can be seen from the few ignorant comments on here. I like that you clearly state your commitment to anti-racism and that simply saying you’re not racist isn’t enough. But it’s also important to stand up to the racists not just to ‘racism’. Things are worse now because racists have organised on our streets and in our town centres and of course online. We have to oppose them. I’d like to see the coop logo on Stand Up To Racism literature for example.

    Reply
  12. I believe appointments should be on merit only via blind selection of applicants without regard to race, creed, gender or orientation.
    Positive discrimination by its very nature always negatively discriminates against others.
    I believe in equality pure and simple. I just wish you did as well.

    Reply
    • Gving the same opportunities to everyone when the scales aren’t balanced in the first place just means inequality is maintained. It’s not that tricky…. Great move Co-Op for becoming active in tackling discrimination.

      Reply
    • I agree totally – merit only. How otherwise would you know when the supposed imbalance has been
      ‘corrected’ and positive discrimination ended? Merit is the only way.

      Reply
  13. I support co-op policy 100%. Racism is alive and kicking. Only yesterday a white woman walked towards me and said: In this country women are equal yet you walk behind your husband. My husband is white and I am Chinese by origin. I’ve lived in the UK more than 30 years and I have 4 postgraduate degrees in this country and in fact part of my PhD was about racism in the UK. Would this woman say the same to me if I were white? I’m sure that you will interpret the woman’s remark in different ways but to me and many of the people in my situation, it’s racist, pure and simple.

    So well done, Co-op to take an Anti-racism stand.

    Reply
    • How does British racism compare with racism in China?

      Reply
      • It depends when you look in time.
        Ask that question of the Black African Diaspora descendants. Ask it of the Chinese themselves who knew full well the wrath of a British Naval Gun Boat sent to quell the temerity of a people not to accept our justifiable trade in Opium. Ask it of the Indians who were similarly treated: the Aboriginal people of Australia and New Zealand and then there is that member of the Special Relationship the USA whose ethnic cleansing based on good Christian values saw the Indian Nations reduced to a shadow of their former population as successfully as the same settlers almost wiped out the Buffalo.

        Motes and Beams is always a difficult game to play!

        Reply
  14. Sell food.
    Leave out the political correctness.

    Reply
    • Maybe look up the history. Or just shop somewhere else if all you want is food, with no thought to anything or anyone else. You use the term ‘political correctness’ like it’s just a trendy thing to actually stand up against racism. Are you anti-racist or not? If not then maybe you don’t have a problem with it?

      Reply
  15. I don’t agree with your new management policy. The right person for the job is how it should be – race, sex, age or sexual orientation should bear no relevance to the appointment process. Actively placing ethnic minority people in these roles is also actively excluding the rest of us. NOT GOOD!

    Reply
  16. I applaud the Co-op and the other big retail stores for this commitment. Being ‘non-racist’ is not enough and that being ‘anti-racist’ is making a stand throughout society against any form of racial prejudice, whether it is obvious or subliminal.

    Reply
  17. Palestinian agricultural organisations and farmers unions are heartened to learn that the Co-Operative Group supermarket chain in the UK has introduced a policy to end trade with companies that source products from Israel’s illegal colonies built on occupied Palestinian land.

    Reply
  18. If we all remember it is a two way thing, that’s the thing!

    Reply
  19. Everyone has the right to be treated with respect. The right person should be hired for the job. Regardless of race & any other protected characteristic. That said, there is both conscious and unconscious bias at work which leads to exclusion intentionally & intentionally. Racism is real and lived by children & adults every day.

    I applaud this stance. Watching Anton Ferdinand’s documentary last night was heartbreaking. How far have we really come? How can the FA not ‘see’ where they need to change?

    Every person, group and organisation should constantly be aware of their bias. I hope I act in a way that is non biased but we all need to on our guard. If we each check our thoughts & feelings and challenge overtly, the bigger picture will improve.

    Reply
  20. Sadly I don’t agree with your statement. We are United Kingdom not segregating by colour I will no longer be shopping at Co Co sadly and closing my online and closing my go op card

    Reply
    • Good riddance. You won’t be shopping at any of the other supermarkets either then will you?

      Reply
    • I sympathise but unfortunately this nonsense is spreading throughout business, academia and the public sphere so good luck with finding an alternative. It is not about the worthwhile objective of treating people fairly and giving equality of opportunity, it comes from a subversive set of ideas which aim at destabilising and overthrowing our society and its institutions.
      For many organisations this is a cheap way of virtue signalling while continuing to exploit workers through low pay and poor working conditions .

      Reply
  21. Well done in being proactive on this topic. Just what is needed.

    Reply
  22. Everybody should get equal opportunity 100%.But what is being addressed is equal opportunity for everyone across all kinds of jobs and all hierarchy which hasn’t been the case for many years. I am not saying don’t see colour, see colour, appreciate it and don’t use it as an obstacle or a reason to treat the individual unfairly.

    Reply
  23. I’m sorry you feel this way Natalie. We will not be changing our stance. This is the right thing to do, we must all educate ourselves on how not to be racist ^T

    Reply
    • Co-Op
      Have you only just found out you are racist?
      How did this racism manifest itself in the past?
      I’m shocked – I shop at Co-Op as I always thought you were above this sort of thing,

      Reply
  24. This is so wrong and misguided it truly makes me want to weep.

    Until now I’ve done almost all my regular grocery shopping at the Co-Op. Sadly, I’m now seriously re-considering where I will shop in future because I do not, and cannot, support these dangerous and terrifying politics.

    Reply
    • Literally every supermarket company is doing this, they’re all standing together and rightly so. You’re gonna be stuck with nowhere to go.

      Reply
    • What makes you feel threatened, Natalie? What do you consider to be the ‘right’ way, if this is the ‘wrong’ way?

      Reply
    • Good.

      Off you pop

      Reply
    • Bye Natalie. Take your money and your ignorance with you.

      Reply
    • Try Sainsbury’s

      Reply
    • Best get an allotment and go veggie then . You won’t be missed

      Reply
    • Please, Natalie, what is dangerous about being fair, honest and upstanding? I honestly cannot see what is wrong about their stance? Genuinely!

      Reply
    • Exactly. Race should not be a factor when hiring somebody. The idea that anyone should have any advantage over others due to their skin colour is abhorrent and these so called “anti-racists” advocating for “diversity shortlists”, favouring certain races over others, are clearly the real racists here.

      I will be seriously reconsidering where I shop from now on.

      Reply
      • Don’t get abusive & call someone a clueless idiot because they have a different opinion from yours. That’s how the real world works – people have differences of opinion. Not everyone agrees with woke groupthink – that’s just a fact.

        Reply
      • Race is not the hiring factor. You’ve missed that part. They won’t hire someone JUST BECAUSE they are a person of colour, that’s reverse racism and helps nobody.
        They WILL, however, work on subconscious bias, which is a real thing. When a foreign name is used on a CV, 50% of the time, there are no callbacks. The CV could be identical to another with a typical John Smith type name, and yet subconscious bias comes in to play. Whether you agree or not, it’s a real thing.

        Reply
        • What Cookwitch said is true. An African friend of mine who works in IT stopped using his African surname on CVs as he never got offered an interview.
          I would make the point that racism is not only black/white it is present in all nations.

          Reply
    • I feel extremely sorry for you Natalie, and I see exactly where you’re coming from. It’s a very sad day that companies have to fall into the twisted system that is being rolled out across the world. A very evil, sinister group of people introducing problems that don’t exist and turning society against itself, but people are just too ignorant to see the bigger picture and are falling for this crap.

      I’m not racist and get on fine with the Moslem girl that wears the head scarf at our local store. I don’t care what colour/religion she is as long as she serves me and treats me in a normal fashion then she’s alright by me, and we can both be polite to each other and treat each other respectfully!

      This is a non existent problem that is being introduced to divide people, and straight away it’s succeeded by the way they’ve rounded on you.

      I understood what you were saying, and you weren’t being racist, you were merely stating the fact that this is looking for unnecessary actions which if left alone would not present anything out the ordinary.

      I too am disappointed with this false issue that’s being presented here. If people want to fall for this crap and support it, then good luck. It’s shopping not a race relations visit to a shop!

      I’ve seen people of all colours and religions working in these shops and I’ve seen none of my fellow residents treating them any differently to the white people.

      Very sad folks & I too am not in support!

      Reply
  25. Sounds to me like coop are just causing more division.

    Reply
    • Only division between the racists and the non-racists. That’s a fine division, no one wants to be on the racist side.

      Reply
    • Bet some people said similar things when the Co-operators campaigned to end slavery and for votes for women etc. Others seem somewhat rankled about South African apartheid boycott too.

      Reply
  26. The co op should not be writing a new curriculum expecting the government to accept it. It is too important to be decided by one group of people within Britain. Most co op members will not be aware of what you’re doing, will be unaware of any detail that’s going to be included and probably not agree with the changes. You should not be using the power of the large number of your members (most of which I suspect basically come to you for basic shopping ), to do this.

    Reply
  27. With you 100% on this subject.
    Any product containing halal should be clearly labelled.
    As a Christian I will not eat any halal prepared foods.
    The public must be able to make an informed choice from reading a clear label.

    Reply
  28. I agree with everything that you say, but please do not use ‘ ‘ as in we’ll. Many of colleagues with limited English only know whole words. So please use ‘we will’ for example instead, then we will all be able to understand.

    Reply
  29. Also, we don’t recommend that you include your personal information on a public post. Regards. ^Karen

    Reply
  30. Hi. Thank you for getting touch.
    The slaughter of animals is an extremely emotive topic and we respect your concern regarding this matter.
    I would like to reiterate our previous responses, which we do think answers the issue you have raised. All of our animals are stunned before slaughter and some, predominately lamb, will receive a blessing after being stunned, prior to being slaughtered to ensure that all of the meat can be utilised by our suppliers, beyond their sourcing requirements for the Co-op. Many UK supermarkets do the same.
    If I can help you anymore then please let me know. Regards. ^Karen

    Reply
  31. Hi James, just to let you know that none of our Co-op meat or poultry is halal or kosher certified. We do sell some non-Co-op branded Halal certified meat in areas where there is sufficient demand which is clearly labelled and all stunned prior to slaughter. Thanks ^Hannah

    Reply
    • About 3 years ago I went into one of your branches in Southampton and in addition to meat, all other products where Halal. I was pleased it was catering for the muslin community, but thought there was no choice for non halal customers.

      Reply
  32. Equality and inclusion has always been at the heart of what we do. We just upped it a gear. Take care. ^Karen

    Reply
  33. I’d prefer it if you would employ people on the basis of their suitability and ability not on the colour of their skin. My former son-in-law was a mining engineer in South Africa and after the election left to work in another country, because posts with responsibility for managing risks underground were being awarded on the basis of affirmative action (as positive discrimination in favour of nationals was called) not on the basis of their skills in dealing with hazardous issues.

    Reply
    • I’m with you Valerie. I also have family and friends in South Africa and so I know a great deal about what you have touched upon. The direction we’re going in here with regards to preferential hiring on the basis of skin colour actually frightens the life out of me. All these people who have blindly and unquestioningly leapt upon and embraced this particular ideology / way of thinking – I would literally get down on my knees and beg them to inform themselves of how things have gone down in South Africa and in other places in which these types of policies have been practiced, to take a glimpse at the result. It is dangerous beyond belief and gives me shivers. I’m so afraid that with these racial politics we are blindly sleepwalking down a dangerous path. It scares the life out of me. Trust me, this really won’t end well.

      Reply
      • Frightens the life out of you to have people of colour working in the Co-Op? I don’t even have the words for this. It won’t be too long until the us becomes a minority white country and the UK won’t be far behind it. What are you afraid of? That the people who have been systematically oppressed and abused for centuries might start giving us a taste of our own medicine?

        Reply
    • I don’t think working in the coop presents the same level of risk.

      Reply
  34. I applaud what you are doing here. but equality should be about all colours and creeds there is disadvantaged white people out there too who need help and Jobs everybody should have the same opportunities. and not just aimed at specific ethnic groups. we are all in it togather and all need chances to get on in life especially the young of every nationality and colour in the UK..

    Reply
    • I don’t think the co-op would disagree Janet. There are people of all colours and creeds who experience hardship, poverty and disadvantage, and all of those people are worthy of assistance.
      But, what is also clear is that people of colour and other BAME people, when compared with white Brits of the same socio economic group etc will be at a greater disadvantage than their white counterpart when applying for a job etc.
      To ignore that would mean that BAME people would never see equality, that they would always be at a disadvantage to their white peers.
      No one when talking about equality for BAME people, or BLM for example, is saying that those people are more worthy or that they matter more than white people. What we are saying and believe is that you cannot have an equal fair society if you leave sectors of the community behind. That is just prolonging the old unequal status quo.

      Reply
    • That is pretty much the most sensible reaction on here… I absolutely applaud the idea of giving the previously overlooked an opportunity…

      Reply

Leave a Reply to Michawel Ellman Cancel reply

Category

Co-op Leaders' Blogs, Steve's Blog, Uncategorized