What do you think about funeral prepayment plans?

“It may not be the stuff of great pub conversations, granted. But there’s a real need for people to start talking a bit more frankly and openly about death, funerals and any wishes they might have for their final farewell.

Unless we talk a bit more candidly about what we’d like to see and hear at our send-off, there’s a real chance that we take these wishes, quite literally, to the grave. (And did you want to be buried by the way?)

Maybe that doesn’t matter. If we’re not here, then what’s the worry? Well, it’s often not quite as simple as that.

I know from personal experience that people who pass away without making plans for their funeral – even if just verbally, leave other people who have to make a host of difficult decisions at a time when they have suffered great loss.

There’s been much talk recently of funeral poverty and the financial burden that has to be met by the surviving loved ones, as they seek to provide the dignified, respectful funeral they would like. And we’re working hard at Funeralcare to ease this financial burden.

Much less is said of the emotional burden of planning a funeral when you’re in the dark about the wishes of the deceased.

That’s why I think there is much to commend funeral prepayment plans. Ours protect you and your loved ones from the future price rises of funerals (which have almost doubled in the last decade) and allow you to do things exactly the way you want, so that your loved ones are not second guessing.

I’d love to hear what you think. Is a funeral prepayment plan for you? And if not, why not?”

Jamie Parker, Funeralcare Insight Manager

Join the conversation! 2 Comments

  1. I guess I’ve never really thought about a plan but I have thought about my funeral. My mates and I have chatted about the tunes we want playing, cremation v burial, other details that we want – the service, the readings, a party, what type of burial, what we’d like people to wear… So I guess we’ve talked about everything except who is going to pay for it and how. Our conversations don’t feel morbid and are certainly not downbeat, they’re about choice and, in a way, going out with a bang!

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  2. Jamie
    I am aged 65 with 3 children and 3 grandchildren and want to ensure, as a final act of kindness to them all, to make my passing as least unbearable as possible.
    To help achieve this, a few years ago, I purchased a Funeral Plan for myself on a “face to face, basis from your Birkenhead office.
    At the time, I was unable to persuade my wife to countenance consideration of purchasing a plan for her…. a view she still holds.
    As a result, when I finally persuaded her a few weeks ago to consider the matter it was disappointing that your funeral plan enrolment and payment processes – required, for data protection purposes, her (not me) to initiate and complete the process of buying a funeral plan.
    The customer experience was off-putting and upsetting for my wife who was obliged to speak to you adviser to confirm that I (as her husband) was authorised to initiate and complete the plan purchase on her behalf.
    As I expected, once the unnecessary data protection hurdle had been cleared, your customer service adviser dealt with me (on behalf of my wife) with courtesy, consideration and empathy which rescued the position for you…. but, I must admit, I came pretty close to sourcing her funeral plan from Dignity!
    Secondly, given that my wife and I now each have a Funeral Plan, I do think it would be most helpful if – privately and in total confidentiality – we could each have access to a space within the funeral bond digital space into which we could each lodge our wishes for the funeral itself (hymns, prayers, speakers, songs, disposal of cremated remains etc.) and, when we change our mind, go back in and make changes to our wishes.
    Best wishes and thanks for the opportunity to have a say on your service.
    Regards
    Frank Nelson
    L12 7JU

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